Britain has a hung parliament with no party achieving an absolute majority

Britain has a hung parliament with no party achieving an absolute majority

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The story so far: Britain has a hung parliament, after Labour’s victory in Southampton Test made it impossible for any party to reach the 326 MPs required to achieve an absolute majority in the House of Commons.

Hung parliament predicted.

Conservatives 314 seats, Labour 261, SNP 35, Lib Dems 12, DUP 10, Ukip 0, Other 13;
Labour performing much better than predicted; Turnout at the election is up in the seats declared so far;
Labour lead suggests big turn out of young voters;

Update 6am:

Theresa May’s future as Prime Minister and leader of the Conservatives was being openly questioned after her decision to hold a snap election disastrously backfired. As the June 8 poll ended in a hung parliament, with no party holding an absolute majority in the House of Commons, Mrs May pledged to offer “stability” if the Tories end up as the largest party with the most votes.

Conservative former minister Anna Soubry said she should “consider her position” and take personal responsibility for a “dreadful” campaign and a “deeply flawed” manifesto after choosing to go to the country three years early in the hope of extending her majority. Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn called on the Prime Minister to resign, saying she should “go and make way for a government that is truly representative of this country”.

Former chancellor George Osborne, sacked from the Cabinet by Mrs May and now editor of the Evening Standard, told ITV: “Clearly if she’s got a worse result than two years ago and is almost unable to form a government then she I doubt will survive in the long term as Conservative party leader.”

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